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LPB Energy’s Environment Footprint

A debate was held on LPB’s Louisiana Public Square

February 26, 2014

Click here for link and video

Details:

Severance taxes, royalties and bonuses from the energy sector account for nearly 17 percent of the state’s revenue stream. But how much responsibility does the energy sector bear for Louisiana’s environmental challenges? A current lawsuit contends that the actions of 97 oil companies have damaged Louisiana’s wetlands and threatened flood protection for coastal residents. The oil and gas industry says its practices were legal at the time and that a surge in environmental lawsuits is driving investors away from Louisiana. Are current lawsuits legitimate attempts at compensation or part of a litigious environment that threatens to kill the state’s oil and gas “golden goose?” Louisiana Public Square looks for answers on “Energy’s Environmental Footprint” airing Wednesday, February 26th at 7 p.m. (Record date Tuesday, February 25th)

Our panelists will be:
• John Barry, “Restore Louisiana Now”
• Sen. Norbert Chabert, R-Houma, member of Senate Natural Resources Commission
• Foster Campbell, Public Service Commissioner
• Keith Hall, J.D., Director of the Louisiana Mineral Law Institute

LSU Media Law professor, Craig Freeman will moderate. The program also includes interviews with Sen. Robert Adley, R- Benton; Don Briggs, president of The Louisiana Oil and Gas Association; Jonathan Henderson, with the Gulf Restoration Network; Oliver Houck, Tulane University Law School; and Keith Lovell, Louisiana Department of Natural Resources.

Backgrounder

Since oil was first discovered in Louisiana in 1901, the state has produced 159.5 trillion cubic feet of natural gas and 17.5 billion barrels of oil, according to the Louisiana Department of Natural Resources. That’s as much oil as the entire United States produced from 2001-2010. Over the years through severance taxes, royalties, rentals, and bonuses, the oil and gas industry has benefitted the state’s economy in varying degrees.